No more charging strippers to Uncle Sam’s plastic

Federal employees who want to gamble or frequent strip clubs for an evening of fun will have to use their own credit cards to pay for it.

PcardAn amendment included in the House-passed fiscal 2016 Defense spending bill prohibits Defense civilian workers and military personnel from using government charge cards for expenses related to “gaming, or for entertainment that includes topless or nude entertainers or participants.”

The language specifically prohibits gaming, rather than any expenses at a casino, so lodging and meals, for example, would be exempt.

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., sponsored the amendment, which was adopted on voice vote. The House on Thursday passed the fiscal 2016 Defense spending bill. The full Senate has not yet considered its fiscal 2016 Defense appropriations legislation.

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See related story at: Senators Want GSA to Catch Feds Who Use Plastic at Strip Clubs

Military chiefs say they’re often blindsided by acquisition problems

Interviews with 12 current and former military service chiefs reveal strong dissatisfaction with their Pentagon acquisition colleagues, who too often change the requirements for weapons systems or demand additional capability, according to the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

pentagon-seal“Some current and former service chiefs said that because they lack visibility into programs, they are unable to influence trade-offs between requirements and resources,” said the watchdog in a report released Thursday. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps chiefs said they are “frequently caught by surprise when cost, schedule, and performance problems emerge in programs.”

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White House objects to Defense bill contracting provision empowering service chiefs

In a Tuesday (June 2, 2015) statement threatening a veto of the Senate Defense authorization bill, the White House objected chiefly to off-budget war funding and the continuing of sequestration.  But it also took aim at lawmakers’ plans to empower the military service chiefs in weapons acquisition and at smaller provisions affecting the contractor community.

US Capital 2As both chambers of Congress begin floor consideration of the $612 billion fiscal 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, the veto threat “strongly” objected to a Senate provision in section 843 designed to alleviate procurement delays prompted, as the Armed Services Committee report put it, by “multiple, duplicative reviews within the Office of the Secretary of Defense and services.” The bill would decentralize decision making on weapons system milestones for service-unique programs and limit documentation of approvals.

The administration called that plan “inconsistent with the secretary of Defense’s exercise of authority, direction, and control over all of the DoD programs and activities.  Since DoD’s founding, the secretary of Defense has served as the principal assistant to the president in all matters relating to DoD and subordinated the departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force to the secretary’s authority.”

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DoD leader raises an eyebrow over proposed acquisition reforms

Both the House and Senate versions of this year’s Defense authorization bill include numerous acquisition reform provisions. But the Pentagon has serious reservations about a few of those measures, including one that would give the military’s uniformed leaders more control over procurement decisions.

The language granting more power to the service chiefs is part of the Senate’s version of the 2016 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which the Senate Armed Services Committee approved by a vote of 22-4 in a closed session last Thursday. The text of the bill still has not been released, but the committee says it would “enhance” the role of the members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shifting some authority into the military services and away from top Pentagon officials.

Frank Kendall, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics
Frank Kendall, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics

One of those officials, undersecretary of Defense for acquisition, logistics and technology Frank Kendall told the Northern Virginia Technology Council Tuesday that he has serious concerns about the path the Senate appears to be forging.

He said the service chiefs already have plenty of ways to influence the acquisition process should they care to exercise them, and that weakening civilian oversight could have severe consequences for keeping programs on time and on budget.

Keep reading this article at: http://www.federalnewsradio.com/394/3860616/DoD-views-congressional-a

Senate defense bill lays out acquisition reforms

The Senate’s version of the $612 billion 2016 defense authorization bill that cleared committee on Thursday treats shortfalls in the acquisition system as a national security threat while pressuring the Pentagon to accelerate planned reductions in headquarters personnel.

US Congress“This is a reform bill,” said Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz. “It tackles acquisition reform, military retirement reform, personnel reform, headquarters and management reform. This legislation delivers sweeping defense reforms that rise to the challenges of a more dangerous world. We identified $10 billion of excess and unnecessary spending from the defense budget, and we are reinvesting it in military capabilities for our warfighters and reforms that can yield long-term savings for the Department of Defense.”

The headquarters staff cuts and purchasing reforms differ slightly from the House version of the bill, which passed that chamber on Friday, May 15, 2015.

“An acquisition system that takes too long and costs too much is leading to the erosion of America’s defense technological advantage, which the United States will lose altogether if the department continues with business as usual. In short, our broken defense acquisition system is a clear and present danger to the national security of the United States,” a committee summary said.

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